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Works

Creative Nonfiction, Issue 45

This is Creative Nonfiction's TRUE CRIME issue, and I had a very good time interviewing Erik Larson, author the bestselling The Devil in the White City and In the Garden of Beasts.

Fifth Wednesday

I was honored to serve as guest fiction editor for the Spring 2012 issue, the tenth edition of this outstanding literary magazine. Visit Fifth Wednesday at:

www.fifthwednesdayjournal.org

TriQuarterly, #133

For 45 years, TriQuarterly has published literature of high imagination and artistry. It was a great honor to edit Issue #133. I'm not alone in my dismay over TriQuarterly's demise, slated for late in 2010.

Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape

Barry Lopez seeks to preserve the diverse and splendid array of words that have evolved to describe America's gloriously varied and storied meadows, mountains, valleys, plains, deserts, forests, fields, prairies, shores, mesas, and hills. Lopez and Gwartney invited 45 writers and poets to compose fresh and new definitions of 850 landscape terms. I am honored to be beside such luminaries as Bill McKibben, Antonya Nelson, Barbara Kingsolver, Linda Hogan, Patricia Hampl, Terry Tempest Williams. I could go on. A big beautiful book replete with drawings and literary quotes, it is unique and singing.

Fresh Water: Women Writing on the Great Lakes

Fresh Water is an amazing and inspired collection about a crucial aspect of life on Earth, the glorious Great Lakes. Contributors include Annick Smith, Susan Power, Laura Kasischke, Judith Strasser, Stephanie Mills, and Jane Urquhart. Thank you so much, Alison Swan.

Writers on the Air: Conversations about Books

In conversation with Donna Seaman, fiction and creative nonfiction writers discuss their inspirations, favorite books, writing process, and convictions literary, personal, and political. Seaman also connects each writer’s books to other writing, creating constellations of related books and ideas to introduce readers to writers they might not discover on their own.

In Our Nature: Stories of Wildness

Fourteen unforgettable short stories explore our perception of nature and the conflict between wildness and civilization. We are nature, in spite of our machines, our plastics, and our artificial ingredients. Yet what do we make of our own nature? How do we explain the paradox of our urge to both exploit and protect wilderness?